You Only Need 5 Ingredients for These Silky Mango Flans

You Only Need 5 Ingredients for These Silky Mango Flans

Take flan to the next level with this five-ingredient mango flan recipe. Flan is a gently baked, velvety custard made with eggs, sugar, and milk. Caramel is usually made first and poured into the flan dish. Once baked and chilled, the flan is inverted onto a dish to reveal a jiggly custard with a caramelized top. There are many ways you can flavor flan, like classic vanilla, coffee, or in this case, mango.

Where To Find Canned Mango Pulp

This flan is silky and smooth with just the right amount of sweetness. It’s mango-forward and the vanilla helps to round out the fruity flavor. Canned sweetened mango pulp can be found at Indian markets or online. Look for cans specifying Kesar or Alphonso mango pulp, as those tend to be the most flavorful. The cans are large, but extra pulp freezes very well, or use it to make mango lassis. Ripe, fresh mangoes can be substituted instead but you will need to puree them and add sugar as canned mango pulp is sweeter.

Making the Caramel

The caramel on top after inverting adds a rich, deep toffee flavor that further elevates this mango flan. Work quickly when your sugar mixture has come to the right color when cooking the caramel. It will continue to cook and darken in the pan even off the heat.

How To Set Up a Water Bath

Use a roasting pan or a large enough vessel to hold plenty of water for the water bath when baking the flan. If you use a smaller dish, the water will evaporate faster, not serving as a proper water bath for this recipe. Add more warm water to the pan when baking if the water evaporates lower than one inch.

Unmolding a Sticky Flan

If a flan doesn’t immediately pop out of its ramekin, you can hold the ramekin and plate together and shake the two up and down somewhat vigorously. You will see the caramel leaking from under the ramekin as it loosens to slide out.

The flan mixture can be made one day ahead of time and after baking, store the mango flan in the fridge for up to three days.

Tips for Making Mango Flans

  • Caramel rules—The key to caramel? As you're bringing it up to a boil, stir it until the sugar is dissolved, but once it starts boiling STOP STIRRING. Stirring while the caramel boils can cause it to crystallize, and then you'll have to start over.
  • Handling your water bath—It's easiest to place the roasting pan with the ramekins inside on the oven shelf, then use a kettle to pour the hot water into the pan. That way, you don't have to move a roasting pan full of hot water from countertop to oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup granulated sugar

  • 1/4 cup water

  • 1 1/4 cups canned sweetened mango pulp

  • 6 large eggs, at room temperature

  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk (about 1 cup plus 3 tablespoons)

  • 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk (about 1 1/2 cups)

  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, optional

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients. Preheat the oven to 350 F.

    Ingredients to make mango flan

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  2. Add 1 cup granulated sugar and 1/4 cup water to a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring often to help the sugar dissolve. Once boiling, cook the syrup without stirring but swirling the saucepan occasionally, until the syrup becomes golden amber in color, 8 to 10 minutes.

    A small pot of boiling sugar water

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  3. Quickly pour the syrup evenly into 8 (7- to 8-ounce) ramekins, coating the bottoms completely. Set aside at room temperature to cool, about 5 minutes.

    A hand holding a pot, pouring hot caramel into small ramekins, sitting in a large roasting pan

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  4. Meanwhile, whisk together 1 1/4 cups canned sweetened mango pulp, 6 large eggs, room temperature, 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk, 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk, and 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, if using, until smooth and well combined in a large liquid measuring cup with a pour spout.

    A large bowl of eggs, condensed milk, evaporated milk, and vanilla being whisked together

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  5. Evenly divide the mango mixture among the ramekins (about 2/3 cup in each). Place the ramekins in a roasting pan. Carefully pour hot tap water into the pan around the ramekins to a depth of about 1 1/2 inches.

    A roasting pan with eight ramekins of raw mango flan being filled with hot water from an electric kettle

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  6. Bake until the mango mixture is just set and the centers jiggle slightly, 35 to 40 minutes.

    A roasting pan with eight cooked mango flans in small ramekins

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  7. Remove the ramekins from the pan and let cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes. Refrigerate, uncovered, until completely chilled, about 2 hours. (If storing for longer periods of time, cover ramekins with plastic wrap.)

    Eight ramekins on mango flan, cooling on a marble surface

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

  8. To unmold the flans from the ramekins, run a small metal spatula or butter knife around the inside of the ramekins and invert each one onto a small plate.

    An unmolded mango flan topped with caramel on a small serving plate, surrounded by ramekins of mango flan

    The Spruce Eats / Photographer: Jenn Causey, Food Stylist: Julian Hensarling Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

Feeling Adventurous? Try This

  • Add 1 teaspoon ground cardamom to the mango for a flavor twist.
  • 4 ripe mangoes, blended, can be used as a substitute for mango pulp. Add sugar since mango pulp is typically very sweet.

Comments

No comments yet. Why don’t you start the discussion?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *